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Eastern Phase

State of Mind

"What the provocative and instigating tittle has from the abyss gaze of the children, the drawings, have of touching. Breaking the artificial boundaries of our lacerated "adults" world that indeed look like angry children who have forgotten what is light, transitory and ludic in life, the artist invites us to dive back, or forward, to meet the playful child, itself anarchic, in their way" LIUDVIK, Caio. (Complete critic below)

Critic by Caio Liudvik 

"Anarchy comes from an inherent desire to the species ... It is only aberration for those who refuse to see that sometimes the only way out is the realization of a dream” Andre Nataf

Anarchy, before and more than a political project, an existential life style, based, when sincerely lived, on generosity, on a trust in humanity, in proportion to the combative anger against shapes and deformations that separate humans from their primitive freedom. These animistic traits abound in the very strong personality and aesthetic of Pérola Maia Bonfanti. (Ad) MIRE by the example of this "State of Mind".

What the provocative and instigating tittle has from the abyss gaze of the children, the drawings, have of touching. Breaking the artificial boundaries of our lacerated "adults" world that indeed look like angry children who have forgotten what is light, transitory and ludic in life, the artist invites us to dive back, or forward, to meet the playful child, itself anarchic, in their way. Pérola says wisely:

“I try to create a relation between "play" and anarchy”

“Because anarchy is not lack of rules, but more fluid rules, near the children's games”

“Something that rule and misrule at the same time. That gives shape, but preserve freedom for mutation. Because nothing is static”


“The game (infantile) is not static, and it gives shapes while the child builds it's universe.”

Fierce ambivalences between transformational winds and regress moorings permeate our times. Old hierarchical moral, political and social structures are questioned. Peremptory diagnosis around narcissism, individualism and apathy of the younger generation are outdated in face of the newborn communication dynamics, largely called "social media", where still, they are not confined: taking the streets, demanding, they are and they make the change. On the other hand, fear, resentment, strangeness makes people close to intolerance, yearnings of "order" restoration, in new and old logic of power. Meanwhile, Pérola's children, pearls themselves, gaze at us. Delicate precious jewelry, with value which cannot be co-opted by the voracious capital radar.

In her gesture towards the far east and native Brazil Pérola only apparently moves away from our most immediate urban tensions that otherwise exploits so well in hers Urban Games already developed in some major cities of the world as Vienna and New York.

Something in her proposition suggests the "degree zero" of a pictorial rewriting of life. Or, from Roland Barthes to another structuralist something here reminds us of "Tristes Trópicos", the classic travel book in which Claude Levi-Strauss describes the gestation of his anthropology along the Brazilian native tribes; the final pages, however, makes a compliment towards Buddhism as a possible disentangle inspiration from the ideological modern antinomies, its selfish violence, competitive, anti-ecological, carrying forward the generous ethic left critique of capitalism, but without their corrupt deviations or totalitarianism, which means, their regression to the logic of power, taking by the same hands left stained with blood in one of Pérola's paintings, or at the verbalized contradiction of another one, "even in the name of Buddha there was war.


They will not, the beautiful and promising Carioca artist seems to tell us, "isms" won't save us, including the "anarchism" cliché. But the gaze conversion. The "eye contact" with those "soul windows" that lurk from children around the world including the playful ones, crying, laughing ones that asks to live within each of us.

Caio Liudvik,

Social scientist, journalist and postdoctoral in philosophy at the University of São Paulo.

S. Paulo, April 2016